Supporting Special Needs

8:30 am 8:30 am

Write emails in a quarter of the time?

By | September 9th, 2015|Adult learning, General, Supporting Special Needs, Technology in Education, Touch Typing Research and Development|0 Comments

What if I told you it's possible to write emails in a quarter of the time? Well, believe it or not, it is possible. Yet 80% of people haven't realized how easy it is to do. And that makes me sad :'( ... because it only takes 10 hours to learn do). First, understand these two basic facts: The average person types at 25 WPM The average person reads at 300 WPM In other words, the average person can read roughly eight times faster than they can type. That poses an interesting question ... Why in the world are we still hunting and pecking at the keys??? It doesn't make any sense. We type eight times slower than we read, so why do we continually peck away at the keyboard? We are literally wasting time. And since the average worker spends 28% of their time in email, I'm willing to do anything in [...]

2:00 pm 2:00 pm

Schools will start teaching typing instead of longhand

By | December 2nd, 2014|General, Supporting Special Needs, Technology in Education, Touch Typing Research and Development|0 Comments

There are a few countries taking the lead but do they have the teaching techniques and skill they need? I found this interesting article in the Helsinki Times and thought I would share this with you. TEACHING children to write is transitioning to a computer era, as traditional cursive writing and calligraphy will not be taught at Finnish schools after the autumn 2016 and will be replaced with the study of typing skills, reported Savon Sanomat on 18 November. "Fluent typing skills are an important national competence," explained Minna Harmanen from the National Board of Education which is currently finalising the guidelines for the new study of writing. Harmanen acknowledged that waiving handwriting will be a major cultural transformation, but added that schools will still have room for altering their studies: when the teachers want, they can still teach longhand. Typing should be also easier to connect to teaching everyday [...]

9:55 am 9:55 am

Typewriter Art with a difference

By | October 16th, 2014|Adult learning, General, Supporting Special Needs, Technology in Education|0 Comments

Paul Smith was born with severe cerebral palsy. In his Oregon nursing, Smith types away with one finger tirelessly. However, he's no author. In fact, he considers himself an artist, and once you see what he's creating you'll certainly agree. http://youtu.be/svzPm8lT36o?list=FLOCo8MSsMgE6DkBBwwsVttw As a touch typing specialist I would not usually promote hunting and pecking at the keyboard, but this is an exception. Paul Smith was born with severe cerebral palsy. He has a special talent, one he has had since an early age. He is unable to use a typewriter like it was intended; in fact, he only uses the letters and symbols on the top row. Paul creates beautiful art using his typewriter, recalling memories and copying from photographs and real works of art. An artist at work. Take a look and see if you agree. We have been teaching how to create this kind of art (ASKII) and [...]

12:30 pm 12:30 pm

How Touch Typing is training your Brain to type effectively

By | October 15th, 2014|General, Supporting Special Needs, Technology in Education, Touch Typing Research and Development|0 Comments

Touch Typing vs Hunting and Pecking Did you know there is a scientific difference between "hunting and pecking" and "touch typing" when typing. Someone who hunts and pecks at the keyboard may be using 2, 4 or even all their fingers, but if they look, even just once, they are hunting and pecking. A touch typist knows the location on the keyboard through muscle memory and does not look at the keyboard when typing. This allows the typist to type faster, almost as quick as the thoughts can come into your head. This cannot be achieved with either hunting and pecking or handwriting. Touch Typing - Why is the Cerebellum is important The cerebellum is located at the base of the brain, just above the brain stem, where the spinal cord meets the brain, and is made of two hemispheres. It is shown here by the large blue cog. It plays an [...]

11:57 pm 11:57 pm

Handwriting vs Typing

By | October 11th, 2014|Supporting Special Needs, Technology in Education, Touch Typing Research and Development|0 Comments

Handwriting is just as important as learning to type. It is all a matter of balance in the 21st Century. Let's allow our children the ability to learn both effectively.    

6:22 pm 6:22 pm

Announcing our Fall 2014 Courses

By | August 14th, 2014|Events, General, Supporting Special Needs|0 Comments

We have just released some new tickets for our Fall Courses. If you haven't signed up your child yet, now is your chance! Space is limited, so please make sure to register ASAP to guarantee your spot. Typing Courses for Kids Courses for children aged 7 +. Learning to type will be the best gift you can give your child today. Courses are available on weekdays and Saturdays.   Learn to Type at the Newmarket Public Library We are excited to announce that we will be running two of our courses at the Newmarket Public Library: • 10 Cool Computer Tips and Tricks ‒ August 19th and 28th, 2014 • Typing Classes for Children ‒ September 10th to October 21st, 2014 (on Wednesday evenings) Robotics for Kids Join us for some robotic fun! Learn how to build and program Lego Robotics. All students are welcome ‒ both inexperienced and experienced [...]

8:47 pm 8:47 pm

Qwertynomics is born

By | May 14th, 2014|Children's Health, General, Supporting Special Needs, Technology in Education|0 Comments

We are back. It is so nice to be back online with our new brand - Qwertynomics - Formally Touch Typing 4 Life. We have been working hard behind the scenes on our products, online courses and classes, so that we can offer MORE of a customized, personalised service to MORE of our valued clients around the world (an ever-growing audience!). So far our clients have been so thrilled, satisfied and happy with our solutions and results, that we only rely on word-of-mouth, client testimonials. We are now teaching to 21st Century Skills for life, using modern and highly successful blended learning for all ages. We are now asking everyone, part of the QWERTYNOMICS learning community, to support and assist us with this undertaking in a meaningful way. PLEASE take a look, learn something new and share it with friends and your circles of influence!! Our new content will be [...]

6:02 pm 6:02 pm

How Typing changed Carly for Life

By | November 4th, 2013|General, Supporting Special Needs, Technology in Education, Touch Typing Research and Development|0 Comments

I was moved by Carly’s story when I first heard about it last year. Take a few minutes to watch Carly’s video. This is not about learning to Touch Type. This is all about finding a voice, a non verbal voice to finally share with the world. You tube clip http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shAHJryco_g “My name is Carly Fleischmann and as long as I can remember I've been diagnosed with autism. I am not able to talk out of my mouth, however I have found another way to communicate by spelling on my computer. (and yes that is me typing on the computer by myself) I used to think I was the only kid with autism who communicates by spelling but last year I met a group of kids that communicate the same way. In fact some are even faster at typing then I am. Last year a story about my life was [...]

9:10 pm 9:10 pm

Back to School with Qwerty

By | September 2nd, 2013|Supporting Special Needs, Technology in Education, Touch Typing Research and Development|0 Comments

The need for new skills Education lays the foundation for our children to have a successful future. From elementary school to middle school and high school, your children are immersed in grade-specific subjects, assignments and activities. During school hours, your students may fell overwhelmed with the presented information, and if they're unable to keep up due to poor handwriting, concentration issues or not understanding, they may simply give up. That's where some extra help is needed. At Touch Typing 4 Life we teach you your child to touch type efficiently and in a fun way. In just a short period of time we can positively change the way your child works. Learning to type with our Qwertynomics methodology not only increases your child's grades but also increases their self-esteem  and confidence. Come and join Qwerty and his friends and a new gaming style of learning. Book early to avoid disappointment. Call [...]

8:57 pm 8:57 pm

Touch Typing benefits for Autistic children

By | August 29th, 2013|Supporting Special Needs, Technology in Education, Touch Typing Research and Development|0 Comments

Touch Typing benefits for Autistic children Children and adults with ASD (Autistic Spectrum Disorders) struggle with both verbal and non-verbal communication, which affects their ability to learn in a traditional teaching environment. Studies have shown that computer based learning and interaction is one way those with ASD can learn and interact. ASD has a tendency to affect sensory processing, which limits writing ability but allows for typing. We currently only teach in small groups which is ideal for all our children. Increased Success Rates We have a very high success rate with autistic students for the following reasons: Each lesson has a defined structure and starting point. Autistic children like to know where to start, how long they have to work for, and when they have finished It is totally predictable as it is the same format every time students enter the program It has an immediate reward system at [...]

11:53 pm 11:53 pm

Save your Kids from the Perils of Bad Typing

By | August 28th, 2013|Supporting Special Needs, Technology in Education, Touch Typing Research and Development|0 Comments

Education lays the foundation of a successful future. From elementary school to middle school and high school, your children are immersed in grade-specific subjects, assignments, activities and social networking. They are spending much of their time clicking away on a computer.   You and your child may not be aware of the hidden dangers. Children need effective, structured instruction in order to learn proper touch typing skills and to prevent them from forming bad typing habits. Poor typing habits can have unforeseen but serious ramifications on your child's future academic and professional success. Here are a few examples of how bad typing habits can affect your child down the road. Poor typing wastes time Touch typing enables you to type rapidly, fluently and habitually. This means you engage all of your fingers as you type without consciously thinking about individual keystrokes whilst never looking at your hands.  Poor typing habits [...]

5:03 pm 5:03 pm

Who has heard of Squag?

By | July 12th, 2013|iPad Tips and Tricks, Supporting Special Needs, Technology in Education, Touch Typing Research and Development|0 Comments

Today I was introduced to Squag and wanted to share it with you. Here are two posts I liked. They are not long or detailed but gives us all a little something to share. "SquagTM [skwag] is a curated, online experience for kids on the autism spectrum (and their siblings!) that allows them to initiate, explore, and self-discover. Our SquagpadsTM give parents an opportunity to learn about their kids and give kids a new way to learn about themselves, making screen time more meaningful." Communication and Friendship written by Chloe Rothschild on December 30, 2012 - Squag Nation Something you should know before you read this post: I communicate better through typing. Imagine living life, knowing that some people may never know how much you really know, or how smart you really are, because when they talk to you, all you usually say is ‘I don’t know’. But -  if you talk to that person on Facebook, Instant Message, e-mail, or [...]